Product Code: 19894
Availability: In Stock
£49.10
Ex Tax: £40.92

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Helen Vertue 1812 - A Scottish Sampler

An historical design from the Scarlet Letter collection.

A beautiful meandering four-sided floral border in an unusually rich colour palette surrounds this traditional Scottish sampler, also featuring a beautiful arcaded floral band at the top and a substantial mansion house in the lower register. Trees, tulips and flying birds flank the house, above which Helen has stitched this verse:

While thus my fingers oer the sampler rove
The leters (sic) form or teach the flowers to blow
Oh may my soul aspire to worlds above
And learn betimes eternal things to know

Stitches used in the sampler are cross, petit point (cross stitch over one thread of linen), eyelet, queen, counted satin and back stitch.

On 35 count linen it will measure approximately 15" x 16-1/2", like the original, which is in the collection of The Scarlet Letter.

The sampler is recommended for any skill level.

Kit contains fabric, cotton or silk thread, needle and instructions.

Cotton or Silk: Many majority of Scarlet Letter kits offer you a choice of silk or cotton. The majority of early samplers were stitched with vegetable-dyed, twisted silk flosses. The DMC cotton floss used in these kits closely resembles this early silk floss in its texture and sheen; however, silk is the material recommended by The Scarlet Letter, as its colours are subtler than the equivalent in cotton floss because the translucent cell structure of silk absorbs the dyes differently. Cotton is less expensive than silk, and the resulting needlework is quite satisfactory. To the untrained eye, the difference between cotton and silk floss will not be obvious. Sewing techniques are similar, except that you use only one strand of silk, versus two strands of cotton. Samplers stitched with silk floss will have a more delicate appearance, slightly more polished, and silk is stronger than cotton. The silk used in these kits is fine French Au Ver a Soie, Soie d'Alger, which does not knot, twist, or stick to your fingers.

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